Age old tradition in South Devon

Cider making at Stoke Gabriel

Local catch

Salcombe Fishing boat

Salcombe fishing boat

Worth seeking out

Variety of west country apples

All produced in the AONB

Tempt your tastebuds

Local products

84% of South Devon Area of Outstanding National Beauty (AONB) is a farmed landscape. It’s characterised by a key number of large farming units with dairying being of particular importance.

However there are a number of artisan producers, who farm a small number of acres and who concentrate on adding value to the raw ingredients. The coast and countryside is rich and varied producing a wide range of speciality food and drink.

With flocks of sheep grazing on the hills, herds of cows on fertile green meadows and fishing boats in harbours, it’s easy to see how local food and this outstanding landscape are intricately linked.

Did you know?

  • The South Devon AONB boasts a vibrant food and drink economy. The countryside is rich, varied, and immensely productive.
     
  • Many of these products have direct links to the shape of the landscape and a number of the landowners have special environmental agreements ensuring that hedgerows and wildlife will thrive.
     
  • South Devon is home to a diversity of small local suppliers. The temperate climate and extended grass growing season has meant that the area is a rich dairying region traditionally home to many small dairyfarms, with a number of producers diversifying into cheese, yogurt, cream and ice cream production over the years.
     
  • Primary producers have added value to their raw materials, providing consumers with a fantastic choice of artisan cheeses, where taste is of paramount importance.
     
  • There are also a number of lifestyle producers who see the South Devon AONB as the ideal location to produce biscuits, chocolates and other more unusual specialities.
     
  • The area is renowned for production of tasty traditional beef and grass fed lamb. There are a number of producers offering farm fresh meat at local Farmers’ Markets and also to local pubs, hotels and restaurants.
     
  • Fresh fish and shellfish are offered in many pubs and restaurants and the area boasts two smokehouses.

Tips for shopping and eating out

When shopping try and make a point of sourcing local produce to really experience what wonderful food this area has to offer.

If you eat out locally, do make a point of enquiring where the ingredients are sourced from. It helps to highlight to businesses that consumers care about traceability and quality local food and encourage them to seek out more local suppliers.

Whenever you purchase food and drink from the AONB you are helping to sustain the local economy and the local landscape.

Farmers’ markets in the AONB

Farmers' markets are an ideal way to talk specifically to the producer and also to taste before you buy. It’s a fun way to buy what’s in season, vegetables, fruit, fish, meat, cider, cheeses, cakes, bread, plants and much more.

  • Kingsbridge the Quay 1st and 3rd Saturday of the month
  • Dartmouth the Old Market 2nd Saturday of the month

In addition to these markets, there is a very good market in Totnes on Fridays with a good selection of local produce from the AONB on sale. In Modury every Saturday morning during June, July and August there's a Barrow Market with local produce, arts and crafts, flowers and plants on sale from wheelbarrows.

Further information

For more information about local foods generally, visit www.lovetheflavour.co.uk.

The AONB Management Plan identifies the need to keep a profitable mixed farming economy producing high quality food, contributing to the distinctive character of the landscape and practising the sustainable management of land, soil and water.

The South Devon AONB Management Plan endorses campaigns promoting high quality, locally produced food and drink which have successfully increased consumer loyalty and awareness of the importance of supporting the local farming community.